Telepolis (in German) reports about the US „National Security and Homeland Security Presidential Directive“ that was apparently ‚taken out with the trash‘ by the White House Communications department on May 9, 2007, and, accordingly, apparently deemed too sensitve to explain even to US Congressmen, has not been approrpriately covered by the media. The directive is intended to ensure US governmental functionality in the case of „catastrophic events“, yet raises concerns for being weak on the definitions as well as giving only the Presidency the apaprently legally unchallengable power to invoke as well as recind this state of emergency.

An article published in the Boston Globe a month after the directive had been published details that even Conservatives who were involved in the campaign against former Democratic Presidential Candidate John Kerry are deeply critical of the directive. According to to the Boston Globe –

„[t]he unanswered questions have provoked anxiety across ideological lines. The conservative commentator Jerome Corsi , for example, wrote in a much-linked online column that the directive looked like a recipe for allowing the office of the presidency to seize „dictatorial powers“ because the policy does not discuss consulting Congress about when to invoke emergency powers — or when to turn them off.“

Interestingly, the Congressman, Peter DeFazio, who is apparently a member of the U.S. House on the Homeland Security Committee and as such entitled to review classified material, asking to review details of the policy on behalf of some of his constituents who worried about „a conspiracy“ being buried in the classified documents, told The Oregonian after his request was denied that

„[m]aybe the people who think there’s a conspiracy out there are right.“

Coming from a Congressman, that’s at least somewhat scary.